Unsplash/Towfiqu barbhuiya – Picture has been edited by Les 3 sex*

Review · PrEP in HIV prevention

6 December 2023
px
text

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a sexually transmitted and blood-borne infection for which there is no cure. If left untreated, HIV can lead to a number of severe health complications, including its most serious stage: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Fortunately, highly effective treatments - combinations of antiretroviral drugs - now exist to reduce viral replication and prevent transmission. Once efficacy had been demonstrated in repressing the virus, several of these drugs were assessed in HIV prevention strategies. This led to the development of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), an oral medication used either intermittently or continuously by HIV-negative individuals to prevent getting the HIV infection. PrEP is commonly used among men who have sex with men (MSM) and also transgender women, who have historically been most affected by HIV.  PrEP uptake has surged since studies like the iPrex trial by Grant et al. (2010) demonstrated its efficacy.  Yet, significant challenges remain in accessing and prescribing PrEP; especially for BIPOC groups experiencing difficulties with access to healthcare and treatment.. However, the future looks promising as clinical and public health practices continue to improve and new drug formulations, including injectable PrEP, become available.

px
text
Scientific papers
px
text
Books
px
text
Recently on this subject
HIV, preexposure prophylaxis, MSM, STI, medication

Comments

Log in ou Create an account . Only subscribed members can comment.